Thursday, March 29, 2012

MISTY MORN STUDY

This study was painted, like so many of mine, as a way of discovering a subject before making a larger version. I don't usually copy my smaller studies exactly as often there are things I wish to change within the context of the work and besides, its not as simple as just expanding the smaller painting. Each work takes on it's own life as it were and for me there is this sort of continual back and forth dialogue with the canvas. I'm constantly asking myself things like "how well is this section working in relation to the 'whole' of the painting" and do these tones need to be darker etc etc. Standing well back helps, as well as squinting - I do this mostly to check on the values and overall design of the work. I do love these atmospheric studies though and am still experimenting with different designs and compositions. I don't think I will ever tire of this kind of subject.

10 comments:

BoholstWife said...

all of your work is so life like...i really need to switch to oil instead of arcylic...my work could come out so much better.I'm such a novice...your style is inspiring.

john said...

It looks really great to me. I want to steal the composition someday, but I know that I would just make a mess of it.
I would also love to watch you work to see what brushes and colors etc. that you use. Like BoholstWife said, your style is inspiring. How long did you live in SA?

Kelly said...

This is really lovely, peaceful.

I am not an artist but am just writing to say that I own a painting of yours of a cedar waxwing, and I have loved looking at it each and every day since I purchased it at The Potomac Gallery in Leesburg, Virginia I'm not sure how many years ago. From the moment I saw it I was just captivated by it, and continue to be!

Hanneke Naterop said...

Thanks for your comment on my blog. I love your art! Love the atmosphere and you have great techinique!

John said...

How big is the actual painting ? Just curious what a good size for a "study" should be.

Jeremy Pearse said...

BoholstWife, thanks for the comments. I prefer using oil for a number of reasons, mainly for the extended drying time as this allows easier blending especially in sky areas. Also I love the textural quality of the paint and the fact that they dry the same color - unlike acrylics!

Jeremy Pearse said...

Thanks John, feel free to use the composition anytime, I'm sure you'll add your own special flavor to the scene. As for brushes and colors, no secrets there, perhaps I'll do a post on them soon. I lived in SA for just over 12 years - grew up there as a teenager and being surrounded by all the wonderful wildlife was really inspiring but unfortunately only started to fully appreciate the fact after I had left!!

Jeremy Pearse said...

Kelly, thank you for stopping by. And a huge thanks for purchasing the waxwing painting - I'm really glad that you are still enjoying it and this means so much to me!

Jeremy Pearse said...

Hanneke, thanks for visiting and your comments - much appreciated!

Jeremy Pearse said...

John, this study is about 9" X 12" (23cm X 30cm). Like most artists, I usually keep them smallish in case something goes wrong, that way I haven't wasted too much time. When that happens I scrub off the paint then try again with another approach. Occasionally I'll paint a larger study in a loose manner just to see if the painting will work at a that size. I find that it is not as simple as just making the same painting larger as each work seems to take on a life of its own. BTW, John Constable often made full size studies before doing his finished paintings.